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Web Design

Nonsense in Form Design

By:

Jason Clark
Jason Clark

on 10/18/2012

As a geek, I’m extremely fond of trying out new apps and purchasing weird stuff online.

More and more I’m confused and annoyed by the process of clicking things that I have no choice but to click. Most of the time it’s designed so badly that if I were a little less tech-savvy I probably wouldn’t even know what I was clicking. As a company that develops ecommerce solutions, I’m aware of and respect the necessity of Terms & Conditions, but that doesn’t mean you need to add another layer of confusion on top of what can be an already frustrating process for a large segment of the population.

Let’s take a look at some good and bad examples of this type of web design. As you’ll see, it’s not just ecommerce, it’s common sense in all form design.

BAD, BAD BAD Examples:

checkout-wtf.pngprefer-nonstop.pngipad-tc-e1350567960537.png

GOOD JOB, People:

GooglePlay-screen-e1350568650644.pngamazon-checkout.png

Amazon had completely taken this acceptance out of their purchasing options. It’s inherent in the process that you accept their conditions.

amazon-tc-e1350568284510.png

Beautiful. No need to check any boxes.

Has anyone else seen extremely bad examples of this nonsense?

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